Ip Man : What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

What martial art did the Japanese general practice and use?

What martial art did the Japanese soldiers use?

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Pretty certain it was karate.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Obviously Karate.

It's the old debate of; Japanese Karate Vs Chinese Kung-fu.

Ip Man proving his kung fu was better, but like he says in the film it's the person, not their technique

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Its a special form of martial art used by 'Extras' in movies before they got pwned by hero or some friend of hero. :-)

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Ah, yes, the well known art of Ki Kama Aas…!

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Karate

Another kind of evil which we must fear most, and that is the indifference of good men

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

The "gi" (uniform) looked like karate, alright. But based on their movements (whatever pathetically little we were able to see since most of the time they were just fulfilling their role as punching bags anyway) it doesn't realllly look like karate. The way they throw their punches, their stances, etc.

For what it's worth, I hold a black belt in said martial art.

So… I'd vote for hello earth's answer:


Its a special form of martial art used by 'Extras' in movies before they got pwned by hero or some friend of hero. :-)


Haha.

Also, can I just rant here that I am quite annoyed at their callous bows at the beginning, just before the fight starts? They look like bobbing apples.

*
Cowboy Bebop Attic:
http://thebebop.fortunecity.com/">http://thebebop.fortunecity.com/

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

I'm a 1st dan in shotokan karate and as you know there are different styles of karate, I was told that before world war 2 and for several years after, the japanese were very secretive about karate as such when other countries had army bases in japan and were trained in karate, the japanese instructors changed the training so it was more of an exercise rather than a deadly form of combat. I totally agree with an earlier post that its not the martial art its the individual. I find it interesting that Bruce Lee always bashed karate and thats because he never fought a japanese master, only american champions.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

U mean he never fought Chuck Norris, the biggest American Karate expert alive https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/data.filmboards/images/emoticons/wink.GIF" alt="wink.gif">

~If the realistic details fails, the movie fails~

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Actually, you could also argue for Steven Segal.

It would be interesting to see how Segal would have done against Lee.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Yes But Seagal doesnt practice Karate…he practice akido, but sure, that would be interesting aswell https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/data.filmboards/images/emoticons/yes.GIF" alt="yes.gif">

~If the realistic details fails, the movie fails~

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Bruce Lee killed Chuck Norris. :P

Post deleted

This message has been deleted.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

The general, in my opinion, had learned many styles of Karate over the years and perhaps even some Kung-Fu styles. He seemed genuine interested in martial arts as a whole, so don't be surprised if he morphed many styles of fighting to create his own "style" if you can call it that.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Interestingly enough, if you watch the Extra features on the rental DVD, the Japanese actor playing the general says he never has done martial arts before and that he had to learn it all for this movie in a short period of time. I think he did a cinematically credible job, although I still like hello-world-1's quite pithy take on it all:

"Its a special form of martial art used by 'Extras' in movies before they got pwned by hero or some friend of hero. :-)"

Couldn't have said it better myself, LOL!

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Karate is a combination of Japanese styules such as Judo and Ju Jitsu and the Okinawan style of Te.

Karate originated from Okinawa.

The Japanese generally practised Judo, Aikido and Ju jitsu

Post deleted

This message has been deleted.

Re: shakil_miah

I practice Shotokan Karate and i didn't see anything close to what i do , so the japanese didn't use Karate that originated from Okinawa(which is Shotokan).

Post deleted

This message has been deleted.

Re: dog658

Sorry evryone. I wasnt talking about the Japs in this movie. I was just generally saying that the Japanese practised other styles such as Ju Jitsu etc

Post deleted

This message has been deleted.

Re: dog658

JUJUTSU exists as a JUDO component.

How can jujutsu be a component of a style derived from it?

Post deleted

This message has been deleted.

Re: marumasa

Brazilian jiu jitsu is brazilian. Learn the difference. Jiu jitsu was practiced and developed by samurai and was originally intended to be centered around sword play - IE disarming your enemy, getting inside of his weapons, breaking his bones, etc etc. There's a big difference between BJJ and traditional JJ. Tradiitonal JJ is meant to be more mobile and BJJ focuses purely on the ground and manipulating your opponent there.

Judo is derived from a lot of the grappling techniques of jiu jitsu. It came much more recently.

Re: marumasa

I don't even think you know what jujutsu is.

Post deleted

This message has been deleted.

Re: marumasa

So…in Japan it's called Jujitsu, and in Brazil it's called Jujutsu? And Jiujitsu came from Judo?! Wow I'm learning new things everyday.

Re: marumasa

no, the guy is right, just the way he says it is a bit confusing for some.

what he means is that first there was jujutsu (traditional jiujitsu as some may call it, the one from japan), from this judo was evolved, taking only parts of its techniques (throws/joint locks/other "safer" techniques). this judo (also known as kodokan judo) was taught to the gracies in brazil and the gracie family continued to "adapt" it and create their own style: brazilian jiujitsu or gracie jiujitsu (as to how much was adapted, that's food for another discussion outside IMDB :P).

to add to the confusion, gracie jiujitsu and brazilian jiujitsu don't necessarily have to be the same thing xD

so the order went like this for dummies: jujutsu -> judo -> gjj/bjj.

hope this has clarified some things for some people :)

Re: shakil_miah

there is no ju-jitsu??? only japanese or brazillian jujitsu??
sorry but japanese ju jitsu is jujitsu (i agree it is now sometimes referred to as traditional or japanese jujitsu) but jujitsu is still jujitsu the original form of jujitsu from which judo, aikido and brazillian jujitsu were born!!

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

No, karate does no grappling. It borrows literally nothing from judo. Judo came around just at the turn of the 20th century and karate was around long before.

Akido was developed at the early part of the 20th century, mostly useful for children to learn due to its lack of damaging attacks and restraintful nature.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

I thought it was the art of looking good on tv. :D

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Good answer, Killer

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

I have been practicing karate for 2 months now. I know it's not much time and i'm a white belt, but still, i don't think it was karate, at least it wasn't only karate. The stances and the punches, it's not only karate, for sure. Maybe it was karate and kung fu, or karate and other martial art.

Same goes for the soldiers.

What's important, as Yip Man said in the second movie, it's not about which martial art is the best. It's about you, it's about the attitude you have towards your opponent, about what you do with what you learned, you can choose to harm or to respect. I think that, more important than who won the fights, is the message that Yip Man sends: be respectful, loyal, never start a fight, be honest.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

A guy I went to college with worked at a martial arts school and everybody was talking about accuracy on various movies and which martial arts star was the best. And I like what he said after the nerds were arguing. He said that if movies intended to show accuracy in martial art's style they'd just film two hours of the martial arts tournaments and wouldn't bother with actors and stunt people. He said they can't realistically make a movie and choreograph a real fight because with a real opponent they are trying to beat each other and have to think on their feet. Stunt people that are skilled have to dumb down their moves for actors with less skill so no one is injured. Plus the scenes have to look good.

The movie is more about telling the story of what happened and how won the fight and who lost and the bigger picture of what it all meant to the people involved. I don't think the movie's goal is to show how any technique is really done. They just have to fake it enough to make the scene work. I'm not martial arts expert, I'm not even that much into martial arts movies but I loved this one. I think the fights were well filmed and directed.

Post deleted

This message has been deleted.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

Well said sandifay62. It's like complaining that Saving Private Ryan wasn't realistic enough because they weren't actually shooting the actors with real bullets.


I know what gold does to men's souls.

Re: What martial art did the Japanese general practice?

omg this thread…It is supposed to be Karate and a rly old style of Karate, but with a mix of judo in it to look good in the film, easy answer to an easy question.

~If the realistic details fails, the movie fails~
Top